Posts Tagged ‘violence

Where to from here for Yuendumu?

Sep 23, 2010 | 4 Comments

By Bernard Leckning We’ve been following the coverage of disturbances at Yuendumu (over here and here). The latest news is that some 100 people from Yuendumu who had fled to Alice Springs have now been moved to Adelaide. This ABC report highlights how, apart from creating strain on welfare services in Adelaide and political tension between the South Australia and Northern Territory governments, there is also the lingering question of how the dispute will be resolved or whether it will be. ...Read more

The imperative to say No

Sep 06, 2010 | 1 Comment

The imperative to say No

While yesterday’s awful events at the Under 17 football grand final have predictably attracted national attention, Friday’s march against violence in Alice Springs was disappointingly overlooked by the media. It was indeed “historic” as Alice Springs police commander Anne-Marie Murphy described it. As Sunday’s brawl illustrates, the challenge facing the marchers is huge. While domestic violence, with all its tragic consequences, is obviously the number one target, t...Read more

Should Customary Law be recognized by the courts?

Dec 22, 2009 | 10 Comments

Should Customary Law be recognized by the courts?

By Dave Price I once asked an old Warlpiri man from Yuendumu, who’d worked as a police tracker for many years, why there were so many young Aboriginal blokes locked up in the Alice Springs jail. He answered; “There’s yapa (Aboriginal law) here,” indicating with his raised right hand, “and there’s kardiya (whitefella law) here,” raising his left hand. “Those young fellas are running around in the middle. They don’t know.” This same old man’s response to a member of the parol...Read more

A voice for change

Dec 09, 2009 | 3 Comments

A voice for change

“We need an act, we need laws that recognize that the problem now is blackfellas killing blackfellas and killing themselves. If a law like the Racial Discrimination Act gets in the way of doing that then it must be changed. We are different, we are special, we have special needs. We are caught in a trap. They want us to be citizens with the same rights but then they want us to keep our culture with no changes. How can we do both?” BESS PRICE speaks out....Read more