Posts Tagged ‘bush law

“Payback with violence must end”: magistrate

Dec 03, 2010 | Discuss

"Payback with violence must end": magistrate

An Alice Springs magistrate has declared “the days of payback with violence must end”, while sentencing ten people to jail for their parts in two riots at Yuendumu, reports Sarah Aitken in today’s Centralian Advocate. Aitkens reported that magistrate David Bamber called on Warlpiri elders at the community to change their law and work out ways to deal with violence rather than encouraging it. Those Mr Bamber sentenced to jail included the mother, father, two brothers and uncle o...Read more

Crime, punishment and chaos

Nov 26, 2010 | Discuss

Crime, punishment and chaos

Reclining in his hospital bed in the surgical ward at the Alice Springs Hospital, Jimmy Watson presented a convincing case for the virtues of Aboriginal traditional punishment. His persuasiveness was less a factor of what he said than the deep conviction and sincerity with which he spoke — a commitment that was reflected in the circumstances in which had found himself. When I visited him with Centralian Advocate journalist Sarah Aitken, Jimmy was recovering from an operation on his right a...Read more

Traditional law: more discussion

Nov 22, 2010 | Discuss

Traditional law: more discussion

It looks like we may finally be seeing a meaningful discussion on traditional Aboriginal law and what place it might have in the Northern Territory of 2010. Unfortunately it seems to be happening too late to prevent further violence in the feuding Central Australian community of Yuendumu. Last year Alice Springs film-maker Danielle Loy launched a documentary called Bush Law , based on the opinions of senior men from the Northern Territory community of Lajamanu who have been calling for mainstrea...Read more

Community leader calls for spearing

Jan 02, 2010 | Discuss

Community leader calls for spearing

The council chairman of the Laramba community just north of Alice Springs says a spearing is the only way to stop escalating violence and menace in the wake of the murder of two men at the community just before Christmas, reports PAUL TOOHEY in the Northern Territory News. Late last year a forum at the Araluen Arts Complex in Alice Springs called for Australian governments to recognise tradiitonal law. It followed the screening of a documentary called Bush law, made by Alice Springs lawyer Danie...Read more

Should Customary Law be recognized by the courts?

Dec 22, 2009 | 10 Comments

Should Customary Law be recognized by the courts?

By Dave Price I once asked an old Warlpiri man from Yuendumu, who’d worked as a police tracker for many years, why there were so many young Aboriginal blokes locked up in the Alice Springs jail. He answered; “There’s yapa (Aboriginal law) here,” indicating with his raised right hand, “and there’s kardiya (whitefella law) here,” raising his left hand. “Those young fellas are running around in the middle. They don’t know.” This same old man’s response to a member of the parol...Read more

Bush law: the forum

Nov 28, 2009 | 4 Comments

Danielle Loy’s film Bush Law presents the passionately held views of a group of senior men from the community of Lajamanu who are calling for the recognition of Aboriginal customary law. It was screened for the first time at the Araluen Arts Centre in Alice Springs in November this year and has already provoked some intense discussion in Alice Springs media. Alice Online filmed the forum....Read more

Is Bush Law the answer?

Nov 16, 2009 | 1 Comment

Is Bush Law the answer?

“Despite the countless government initiatives and billions of dollars invested in attempting to reduce it, crime in the Northern Territory Aboriginal population is at an all-time high. This is because there are two legal systems. One of them is 40,000 years old. The other is 200 years old and has been imposed without consultation or respect. Whilst only mainstream Australian law is legally recognised, the simple truth is that Aboriginal people living in remote Australia pay more attention to A...Read more